In this richly textured volume, geographer Michael Dear draws on diverse sources and literature across the humanities and social sciences to show how a third nation at the US-Mexican border has evolved historically and how it has confronted recent dramatic changes in the region. Dear powerfully contends that the wall at the boundary eventually will fail because the zone long has been characterized by coherence and cooperation. Although they have shifted, these practices continue in the face of both the Mexican drug wars and increasing US border security measures. The book's tight, clear prose and structure — beginning with historical context and moving to current debates — builds toward the overarching argument against walls. Dear offers persuasive reasons why they won't work, including the long history of border thinking and collaboration across the divide.

Immediately setting up the unequal power relations that...

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