El Alberto, a small town in Hidalgo state, has gained renown for its Caminata Nocturna, a staged reenactment of undocumented border crossing into the United States. This blend of ecotourism and agitprop attracts urban tourists and journalists. It also drew Leah Sarat, a scholar of religious studies, to look closely at El Alberto over the past 50 years. This Otomi- (or hñähñu-) speaking community features a distinctive religious landscape: the majority consider themselves Pentecostal (nationally, only 7 percent of Mexicans identify as Pentecostal). Today, about half of what was once the town's total population now lives in the United States. This engaging case study explores the deep connections between migration, community, and religious change. Crossing, we learn, is “a deeply religious matter” (p. 3).

Fire in the Canyon reads largely as a microhistory, based upon interviews and fieldwork in El Alberto...

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