Tracy Brown's book is more ambitious than its title would have us believe. Properly speaking, its general subject is power as exercised by Europeans and Indians, both men and women, from precontact times through the end of the colonial period. It is true that the documentation is far more abundant for the eighteenth century than for the earlier period: many records were destroyed during the Pueblo Revolt of 1680. But Brown makes use of the archaeological record and interrogates the sources available for the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries to undertake a longue durée reconsideration of how the Pueblo peoples of New Mexico organized themselves, exercised power, and coped with the immense challenge of Spanish colonialism through a combination of tactical modifications, remarkable continuities, and pragmatic concessions.

Pueblo Indians and Spanish Colonial Authority in Eighteenth-Century New Mexico revisits a number of strategies and...

Article PDF first page preview

Article PDF first page preview
You do not currently have access to this content.