Books concerning the Virgin of Guadalupe generally tend to fall into several categories. There are pious literature for Catholic devotees written in an apologetic vein, polemical gibes by evangelicals and Pentecostals for proselytizing purposes, simplistic expositions of a supposed syncretism between the Virgin Mary and some Aztec goddess, scrutiny of the foundational texts to prove or disprove the historicity of apparitions and personages for nationalistic purposes, metahistorical admiration of Guadalupe as a feminist symbol of racial and gender liberation, and scholarly works that seek to contextualize and understand the Guadalupe phenomenon through the use of a variety of academic disciplines. Jeanette Peterson's handsome and hefty book falls squarely into the last category. The author's overarching question is what a rigorous application of the discipline of art history can reveal about the Guadalupe images and their multiple meanings for multiple audiences. Her magisterial...

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