Amara Solari focuses on space as a critical dimension of negotiation and transformation in colonial Yucatan. She addresses the ways in which pre-Columbian Maya spaces became part of Christian ritual space but also explores the influence that Maya concepts of space and sacredness exerted on Franciscan strategies and Spanish administrative aims. Through early colonial Maya documents and information on construction of early churches and monasteries at Maya sites, particularly Itzmal, she succeeds in her goal of expanding awareness of how Maya actions contributed to the character of the post-Columbian landscape of Yucatan, both sacred and profane.

Space, transfiguration, and Maya cultural production tie the volume together, but each chapter is distinctive. The first two chapters discuss the Franciscan strategy of constructing churches in Maya sacred precincts and the policy of concentrating people in towns reconfigured to European grid patterns. Although this seems...

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