Queen for a Day analyzes “transnational, regional, national, scenic, and corporeal levels of the negotiation of power” (p. 5), as Marcia Ochoa explains. This is an interesting book because it uses different types of documents to explain the world of misses and transformistas in Venezuela. From my analytical perspective, it is an attractive work that not only studies the national production of femininity, a process that can be reconstructed in different countries, but also connects it with the formation of Venezuelan modernity. Furthermore, the book most importantly seeks to find a connection between beauty, the body, and power.

The bodies of females and transformistas are the focus of different forms of political and medical involvement that place at the center of the discussion the topic of aesthetic violence, of crucial importance in the postfeminist political and medical debates. More specifically, Ochoa explains...

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