The purpose of Scott Cook's Land, Livelihood, and Civility in Southern Mexico is to promote understanding of the peasant economy and citizenship in nineteenth- and twentieth-century Valley of Oaxaca. Four of the nine communities researched by Cook—Santo Tomás Jalieza, Santo Domingo Jalieza, Santa Cecilia Jalieza, and Magdalena Ocotlán—belong to the Ocotlán de Morelos district, while San Juan Teitipac, San Sebastián Teitipac, San Antonio Buenavista, San Lorenzo Albarradas, and Xaagá belong to the Tlacolula de Matamoros district. The inhabitants of these localities speak Zapotec and Spanish, except for San Lorenzo Albarradas and Xaagá, where only Spanish is spoken. All these places are peripheral to the city of Oaxaca. With the exception of San Antonio Buenavista, their origins stretch back to the pueblos de indios (indigenous towns) settled under the viceregal government. Until the mid-twentieth century, three large haciendas surrounded the communities: San Antonio...

You do not currently have access to this content.