The role of the middle-class reformers and their efforts to open up political spaces for the consolidation of a new kind of citizenship in postrevolutionary Mexico are the main focuses of this book. By looking into the specific policies in relation to motherhood, the poor, charity, and welfare in Mexico between 1930 and 1950, Nichole Sanders's study evaluates the role of social reformers in the construction of the Mexican welfare state. A particular focus is the analysis of those institutions dedicated to state policies regarding family, children, and motherhood, such as the Pan-American Child Congresses (1935, 1942) and the Secretaría de Asistencia Pública, founded in 1937 and transformed into the Secretaría de Salubridad y Asistencia (SSA) in 1943. Discussion of both the development of social work as a career for women and the emphasis on female participation in state-sponsored, social-oriented institutions complete...

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