This book addresses the ways in which Brazilian society has represented its Indians for the last century and a half. Using the concepts of Indianness (“imagined representations of difference” [p. 14]) and indigeneity (“lived experience” [p. 14]) as the backbone of her analysis, the author explores various facets of indigenism and a wide range of situations, from ludicrous pop shows, operas, and novels to the Paraguayan War, interethnic marriages, education, land rights, legislation, state policies, and the thorny issue of authenticity. All this is based on solid documentation, including some outstanding illustrations. Both her extensive research in archives and interviews bring about crucial problems of representation that have plagued interethnic relations since the sixteenth century and have kept the Indians in a continuous state of domination and subalternity vis-à-vis the national society. The book makes theoretical incursions into history, anthropology, education, and...

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