This detailed political history insists that the Luso-Atlantic world did not undergo an Age of Revolution. Rather, Brazil and Portugal were closely knit in the second half of the eighteenth century and remained so, despite Brazilian independence, until 1850. Paquette focuses on individuals whose political thought, actions, and roles reverberated back and forth across the Atlantic. These individuals, such as the cosmopolitan and pragmatic civil servants of the late Portuguese empire, the members of the royal family, British diplomats, officials in Rio de Janeiro and Lisbon, and Portuguese political exiles, all struggled with the pieces of the once coherent empire that began to break apart when Napoleon invaded Portugal in 1807.

Paquette asserts that the Portuguese empire was well integrated in the second half of the eighteenth century. Colonial officials were educated at the University of Coimbra and typically served on three...

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