This volume uses a well-defined methodological approach that sets it off from the vast scholarly literature on the topic of Latin American populism. The book consists of seven country chapters and six theoretical ones that systematically explore three categories of populism corresponding to distinct historical contexts: classical populism, whose heyday was the 1930s and 1940s; the neopopulism of the 1990s, which combined populist styles and strategies with neoliberal economic formulas; and the radical populism of the twenty-first century, most plainly represented by Hugo Chávez. The chapters examine different manifestations of populism and pose the question of whether individual governments corresponding to one of the three categories can be considered truly populist. In addition, the authors focus on continuities and contrasts in an effort to determine whether a populist tradition exists in specific countries. In his chapter on Ecuador, for example, César Montúfar...

Article PDF first page preview

Article PDF first page preview
You do not currently have access to this content.