Christopher Hull has discovered that, whereas Cuban diplomatic records remain closed to investigation and US records only occasionally mention British involvement, British governmental records offer an “uninterrupted and revealing” source of information about British diplomacy and policy toward Cuba, with many insights about the relationship between the United States and Cuba (p. 14). Working through the files of the Foreign Office as well as other British governmental records, Hull offers in British Diplomacy and US Hegemony in Cuba, 1898–1964 an engaging new perspective on the history of Cuban foreign relations, an important contribution to a historiography too often fixated narrowly on the Havana-Washington axis.

The narrative proceeds chronologically from perfidious Albion's seizure of Havana in the Seven Years' War to Britain's gradual acceptance of the “‘natural hegemony’ of the United States in its own sphere” (p. 24). Chapters 2 and 3 describe...

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