The Plan de San Diego, a 1915 manifesto that proposed a rebellion against US rule in the American Southwest, has attracted sustained scholarly attention since the 1950s. The uprising associated with the Plan began as a series of raids on ranches, irrigation works, and railroads by ethnic Mexicans and quickly developed into a full-blown regional rebellion, in which a small guerrilla army battled local posses, Texas Rangers, and the thousands of federal soldiers dispatched to quell the violence. In response, vigilantes and the Rangers led a far bloodier counterinsurgency that included the indiscriminate harassment of ethnic Mexicans, forcible relocation of rural residents, and mass executions. This episode was recognized at the time as part of the wider unrest, violence, and surveillance brought to the United States–Mexico border by the Mexican Revolution.

This latest addition to the corpus of work on the Plan...

Article PDF first page preview

Article PDF first page preview
You do not currently have access to this content.