Times are tough for the discourse of human rights. Assailed for its privileging of the individual over the communitarian, for being a colonial imposition of Western technocrats, for having supplanted struggles for real socioeconomic change, or for portraying the nation-state as the exclusive guarantor of freedoms, human rights as a “discursive framework” (p. 7) has come under significant fire from scholars in recent years. The language of solidarity has fared little better, criticized for reifying North-South imbalances of power and resources or for representing little more than fleeting bursts of empathy directed by the world's haves to its have-nots — as in, for example, the aftermath of the 2010 Haitian earthquake. But as Jessica Stites Mor argues in the impassioned framing essay that introduces her important edited volume Human Rights and Transnational Solidarity in Cold War Latin America, such critiques risk...

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