The regime of Porfirio Díaz set the historical stage for the Mexican Revolution through an exclusionary model of state-driven modernization founded on the country’s participation in the global economy, the imitation of foreign models of economic and cultural development, and an utter disregard for the social costs of this version of order and progress. By proposing a reinterpretation of this process of incipient industrialization, urbanization, and cultural modernization through an analysis of consumer culture, Steven Bunker not only begins to fill a void in Mexican historiography but also makes an original contribution to the new and promising history of consumption in Latin America.

The book consists of six snapshots of distinct topics related to the main subject. Chapter 1 analyzes the production and marketing of machine-rolled cigarettes, a cheap and ubiquitous mass-produced commodity, by focusing on the company El Buen Tono. It briefly...

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