In this impressive book, Steven A. Wernke combines archaeological and ethnohistorical methods to study the Colca Valley in southern Peru. The material spans a 500-year period from the twelfth to the early seventeenth century, during which the residents of the Colca Valley experienced first Inka and then Spanish colonization. The author, by employing the same analytical frame to interpret the effects of both Inka and Spanish colonization, works against the notion that archaeologists focus on pre-Hispanic times while historians cover the post-contact period.

Chapter 1 introduces the Colca Valley and its inhabitants—the Aymara-speaking Collagua and the Quechua-speaking Cabana. Chapter 2 explicates the central theoretical concepts of the book: community and local landscape. Wernke understands these as the two areas where individual and imperial interests intersect. In chapter 3 Wernke pays special attention to the available ethnohistorical texts from 1591 to 1617, which provide both detailed demographic information and extensive land-use...

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