To European capitalists, many of whom were newcomers to the market, Mexico in the 1820s appeared to offer guaranteed, profitable returns on investment, making it a veritable El Dorado. To Mexico, London appeared to be a pot of gold, a bottomless source of easy funding. On both sides of the Atlantic, individuals and organizations would soon be disabused of these preconceptions, as promise and opportunity proved to be as illusive as gold at the end of the rainbow. Why Europeans chose to invest in Mexico, who invested there, how savers were convinced to part with their money, and what these savers knew about the country are questions addressed in Bubbles and Bonanzas, a timely revisiting of British economic engagement with Mexico by an author who has devoted many decades to studying the subject. This book focuses on the individuals whose imaginations and...

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