The contributors to this timely volume reject political and public discourse, which too often characterizes Mexicans as invaders or as the Other. Rather, the authors argue that, historically and culturally, Mexico and Mexicans were key participants in the construction of the United States. Moving from the Hispanic capitalism of northern New Spain to the claims of superior “Yankee patriarchy” and finally to the murky state of race and the persistence of mestizaje in the twenty-first century, this collection offers engaging essays that emphasize an integrative history of the two countries.

John Tutino provides a sweeping overview that links New Spain, Mexico, and the United States from the sixteenth century to the present. As Europeans, Mesoamericans, and Africans moved to northern New Spain, drawn by the promise of silver, farming, and grazing, what emerged was an ethnically complex and economically stable region. Even when the border moved south, Hispanic capitalism and...

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