In the conclusion of this provocative work, the historian Alan Knight tries “to pin down” the meaning of resistance (p. 325), which is at the heart of the project that inspired the production of this book. In his introduction, anthropologist John Gledhill makes “a case for rethinking resistance” (p. 1), a process he and coeditor Patience Schell, a cultural studies professor, helped organize through a series of seminars held in Brazil, Mexico, and England. Knight agrees with Gledhill that resistance is a useful category of analysis if social scientists and humanists “aspire to a more just and less unequal society” (p. 338). Indeed, the majority of the 17 authors would seem to agree, if their choice of objects is indicative, that the subjects of resistance studies should be subordinate individuals and groups, not elites.

This is one criteria Knight discusses in attempting to elevate resistance to the category of a...

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