Argentine historian Félix Luna once asserted that “nadie podrá escribir la historia del Partido Peronista . . . porque no existió” (p. 51). With decision-making power concentrated in Juan Domingo Perón at the apex of the state, the Peronist Party was, in Luna’s estimation, merely a facade. This conventional wisdom has long endured, but it has been challenged recently by a wave of research on the Partido Peronista — its institutions, second-line leaders, internal procedures, and frictions. Oscar Aelo’s El peronismo en la provincia de Buenos Aires, 1946 – 1955 makes a significant contribution to this literature by tracing the party’s rise and consolidation in Argentina’s largest province. It builds on recent studies by scholars such as Moira MacKinnon, César Tcach, and Darío Macor on the party’s origins and its advance in different provincial contexts. Aelo’s work captures the historical contingencies of a...

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