Bridging various approaches to border studies, this fascinating and far-ranging collection assembled by Alejandro Madrid is solidly grounded in the aural culture particulars of the US-Mexico transnational soundscape. Music is the thing, but not without critical considerations of identity, history, gender, sexuality, and generation, among other topics. Madrid insightfully sketches the historiography of borderland studies from early treatments by Herbert Eugene Bolton to Américo Paredes’s ethnographic work at mid-century (including the invention of the term “Greater Mexico” to designate the migrant diaspora beyond political boundaries). Especially important in this was the critical identification of Mexicans as people who commonly faced Anglo discrimination and violence in the US Southwest. This approach (similarly undertaken by Carey McWilliams roughly around the same time) defined border culture in terms of social, economic, and political struggle. Subsequent treatment by Chicano scholars officially gave rise to the field of...

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