Through an interdisciplinary examination of the processes by which modern social clubs emerged after the formation of the Cuban Republic in 1902, Maikel Fariñas Borrego reconstructs the history of these institutions, especially yacht and tennis clubs. Following the Spanish-American War, the United States assumed an influential role in Cuba’s social culture. The expansion of American corporate and political dominance had a tremendous impact on the rapidly transforming Cuban elite. The war allowed new spaces for participation to individuals who had been previously excluded from the political sphere. Once the war was over these individuals, together with the economic elite, began to create private spaces in which they could create and perpetuate a new class consciousness.

During the first 28 years of the republic, a number of social clubs were created in Havana. The creation of these clubs “facilitaba a las élites diseñar estrategias...

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