Michael Goebel’s detailed study focuses on the “politics of history” in Argentina — on how the state, political actors, and intellectuals produced and used particular understandings of national identity. He specifically pays attention to two versions of Argentine history related to cultural and political struggles since the nineteenth century. The first, revisionism, is an oppositional nationalist account that appeared in the 1930s. Rooted in changes in the cultural field and the discipline of history in the early twentieth cen tury, revisionism was initially related to antiliberal and conservative sectors. It was later appropriated and resignified by left-leaning, Peronist, national liberation groups, and since 2003, by the administrations of Néstor and Cristina Kirchner. The second version, which revisionists called official or “liberal” history, originated in the second half of the nineteenth century. It was related to the emergence of Argentina’s modern state and was...

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