This noteworthy volume gathers papers given at workshops held at the Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla and the Colegio de Tlaxcala. Moving away from structuralist analyses, scholars have recovered an actor-centric view now honing in on all social and ethnic groups. Editor Evelyne Sanchez emphasizes in her careful introduction that methods such as microhistory have shed light on “actors who negotiate and do not submit absolutely to a normative system” (p. 7). Network analysis has usually explained boundaries and causes of group actions, argues French historian Michel Bertrand in an interesting twist, but it also elucidates the margins of autonomy of historical actors within or beyond these restrictions. He warns, however, of the pitfalls in recent works that have reverted to pure genealogy or misinterpreted mere contacts between actors for solidarity. This methodological thread loosely stitches together the following chapters.

Frédérique Langue maintains...

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