In the last 20 years, studies of the political transformation of Spanish America in the age of revolutions have highlighted the region’s full participation in an age of imperial reform, colonial resistance to increased control and taxation, and use of imperial instability to experiment with autonomy and sovereignty. The role of municipal politics has been front and center in such studies since Concepción de Castro (La revolución liberal y los municipios españoles, 1812 – 1868, 1979) identified the connection between Spain’s nineteenth-century “liberal revolution,” the Constitution of Cádiz, and municipalities. In the Spanish American context, scholars have tended to focus on not only Cádiz but the role of municipalities in shaping and responding to Bourbon politics through the process of independence, and the countries that subsequently emerged in the early national period, whether from the angle of political, economic, social, or...

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