This book examines how the Bourbon Reforms and Enlightenment ideas affected the attitudes of male administrators and intellectuals about women by studying their writings about the female body. The research crosses legal, religious, and scientific discourses and rests on legal documents as well as lesser known publications slighted by literary scholars and historians. The study’s originality comes from its exploration of the gendered meaning of neglected scientific writings. The writing is clear despite the complexity of the subject and should appeal to Andeanists, colonialists, and women and gender scholars.

Each chapter deals with a specific manifestation of the female body. Micaela Bastidas, executed for treason in 1781, represents the political body; the drawings in Trujillo del Perú, the economically productive or commoditized body; the convent history written by Sor María de la Santísima Trinidad discusses the religious body; and the medicalized body...

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