This issue of HAHR offers three exemplars of the “transnational turn” as applied to Latin American history. These essays remind us that, almost since the field’s inception, the study of Latin American history has tended to be transnational in orientation. Whether focusing on the colonial period, struggles for independence, the turn-of-the-century export boom, the region’s role in the Cold War, or other topics, historians of the region have almost reflexively set their research in transnational and comparative context. These three essays link directly to those historiographical traditions; at the same time, all three articles, and a fourth on creole anti-Communism in Peru, remind us of the need to connect transnational approaches to deep research into local contexts.

María-Aparecida Lopes and Paolo Riguzzi consider the tightly integrated nature of the United States and Mexican cattle industries. Sharing a common border and very similar environmental...

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