Made in Mexico is a very important book that fills a number of gaps in the literature on postrevolutionary Mexico by tracing the national and regional development of the country’s industrial sector. The book, which explores the conflicts among industrialists and labor leaders as well as state and federal policy makers over statist industrialism, is well written, thoroughly researched, and rests firmly on materials from Mexico City’s national depositories as well as the state archives of Jalisco, Nuevo León, and Puebla. According to author Susan Gauss, the postrevolutionary Mexican state sought to reconcile class interests in order to advance industrial capitalism. Federal policies were “shaped not only by dependent development and radical revolutionary ambitions, such as working-class mobilization, but also by regional resilience generated by shifting local alliances of industrialists, labor, and politicians” (p. 17). In spite of the many problems faced by federal officials, Gauss concludes that statist industrialism...

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