The Columbian quincentenary celebration renewed scholarly interest in what Alfred Crosby defined as the Columbian Exchange. Historians, archaeologists, demographers, ethnologists, and ecologists began pushing the boundaries of traditional knowledge regarding the events and processes that Columbus triggered when he bumped into the western hemisphere. That geographic accident not only reshaped the contours of the globe but, since the quincentenary, has resulted in an extensive literature on this grand narrative of conquest and change.

In its emphasis on indigenous strategies of resistance and accommodation to Europeans (largely Spanish) and their institutions, this volume is a descendent of quincentenary knowledge. The editors, Matthew Liebmann and Melissa Murphy, assembled a diverse group of archaeologists of the Columbian and post-Columbian periods for the task. The temporal span is the sixteenth through the nineteenth century. The geographic, ethnic, and topical spread is similarly broad, including the Joara of...

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