The historiography of this book is as excellent as could be, within the limitations of a developing economy like Colombia. In contrast, it is somewhat meandering in its treatment of the topic, and the reader can easily get lost in the comings and goings of the volume. Within these extremes, it provides important lessons within the field of political economy.

Mucha tela que cortar illustrates Colombian history in the twentieth century, emphasizing economic and political events, and leaves us with lessons applicable not only to that country. The story begins just before the First World War, at the height of the international economy based on expanding trade, capital, and labor movements across regions, and a world currency system based on a flexible gold standard. Politically the world lived in the midst of a colonial system in which the Western nations dominated, formally or...

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