In 1932, blonde, 18-year-old Ana Rovner became Miss Once, named for a Buenos Aires neighborhood with a considerable Jewish population. She then became Miss Capital, hoping to become Miss Argentina and enter the Miss Universe contest. Although Rovner did not refer to her Jewishness, her background was never a secret. A couple of years later, President Agustín P. Justo attended a solo performance by Berta Singerman at the Teatro Colón, the temple of elite porteño culture. Singerman, who had begun her career in Yiddish theater, acquired national and international fame for her recitations. At the peak of her career, she performed for 70,000 people in Córdoba. These anecdotes illustrate the visibility of Jewish-Argentine women in both popular and high cultures in 1930s Argentina, precisely at a time of growing nationalism and xenophobia in both Europe and Latin America.

In the masculine public space...

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