While historians of colonial Peru are well acquainted with native authors Felipe Guaman Poma and Inca Garcilasco de la Vega, Alcira Dueñas’s new work brings together a larger body of similar texts in order to outline a critical mass of indigenous Peruvians who brought formal written complaints about their mistreatment to the courts in Lima and Madrid. Dueñas argues that these men used their literacy skills to gain access to the “lettered city” inhabited by elites, ecclesiastics, and bureaucrats. In so doing, they relied on transatlantic networks of information, support, and legislation that brought some of them all the way to the Royal Court in Madrid. The book shows that Andean protests against Spanish rule were far from silent in the years between the defeat of the Inca at Vilcabamba in 1572 and the Túpac Amaru and Túpac Katari Rebellions of the early...

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