The Iberian expansion overseas had profound repercussions for the historical and intellectual transformations that took place during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Although the impact of the discovery of a new continent populated by hitherto unknown (to the Europeans) peoples, plants, and animals has long been acknowledged by scholars, the specific mechanisms by which information about the new lands was gathered and processed has only recently been brought to the fore in the English-speaking world, thanks to the work of historians such as Antonio Barrera-Osorio, Jorge Cañizares-Esguerra, Ruth Hill, or Daniela Bleichmar, to name just a few. To this group of important works we must now add María M. Portuondo’s Secret Science, a book devoted to the cosmographic and cartographic activities developed in Spain after the discovery of America. Following a tendency in recent studies on early modern scientific practice in the...

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