Nativism, the idea of intense opposition to an internal minority because it is foreign, is a major theme in US immigration scholarship, and Nación y extranjería reveals its significance in case studies throughout Latin America. In this eight-essay compilation, Pablo Yankelevich coordinates the work of an international group of scholars who examine how nativism influenced emerging Latin American nation-states in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. He builds on his work concerning exiles and deportations in the early twentieth century to explore how Mexican immigration policies are part of a larger Latin American trajectory of immigrant exclusion. Through an analysis of Argentine, Brazilian, Cuban, and Mexican immigration policies, the authors explain how some immigrants were evaluated by Latin American officials to be “desirable, suitable, or assimilable” (or not) in these nation-states.

Yankelevich sets out to understand specifically the problems of national identity with respect to modern nations and what are...

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