Peter Manuel and the contributors to this volume deliver a much-needed study of the contradance and quadrille traditions of the Spanish-, French-, and English-speaking Caribbean islands. Rather than focus on individual islands or twentieth-century music and dance genres, Creolizing Contradance offers a panregional, synthetic examination of contradance and quadrille music and dance forms as they developed in the Caribbean in the nineteenth century. This neat volume is refreshingly cohesive, a feat this reviewer attributes to the contextual information presented in the introduction and to the individual authors who follow through on the methodological goals of “treat[ing] each area in a relatively consistent manner, covering historical development, musical and choreographic aspects, and a set of relevant sociocultural themes and approaches” (p. 2). The introduction and subsequent six chapters (on Cuba; Puerto Rico; the Dominican Republic; Guadeloupe, Dominica, Martinique, and St. Lucia; Haiti; and the English-speaking Caribbean) take careful note of the...

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