This volume, derived from a conference held at the University of Pittsburgh in 1998, sets itself the ambitious task of advancing new models “not only for reading, but also resolving the ubiquitous interlacing legacies of capital, coloniality, and race” in Latin America (pp. 5 – 6). Individual chapters offer an array of insights into these legacies in Uruguay, Haiti, Puerto Rico, Brazil, Mexico, Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, and the French Antilles, even if, not surprisingly, they are only partially successful in actually resolving the problems provoked by colonialism. As this list of countries indicates, the volume is unusually broad in its geographic scope; the authors are to be congratulated in extending their scholarly focus beyond the familiar territory of Mexico and Peru.

Individual chapters take varying approaches to the aim of reading and resolving colonial legacies. Gustavo Verdesio comments on the Uruguayan state’s alternate attempts to erase and exalt the country’s...

You do not currently have access to this content.