Gilberto Freyre (1900 – 87), a Brazilian author whose works have been widely translated, disseminated, and debated, is unquestionably a global academic. Born and raised in Pernambuco, Freyre wrote the classic and pioneering work Casagrande & senzala (1933), which has shaped research priorities in Portuguese Atlantic studies for decades. His works have contributed greatly to the study and understanding of new research fields such as Black Atlantic rebels, slavery in the New World, and cultural hybridity. Considered by many to be a man ahead of his time, he was and still is a controversial figure. His most famous thesis, that in Brazil racial harmony prevailed, figured prominently in the creation of the so called “myth of racial democracy.” Accused of being a conservative, Freyre’s works were later spurned by the left in Brazil. This situation changed in the 1990s when the author was...

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