It would be hard to overstate the importance of José Pedro Barrán’s contributions to Uruguayan historiography. In some ways, he is Uruguayan historiography. When Professor Barrán passed away in September 2009 at the age of 75, his death made headlines rarely afforded to scholars in the United States. “José Pedro Barrán has died and history will never be the same,” declared the Uruguayan paper La República. The author or coauthor of at least 30 volumes of Uruguayan history since the mid-1960s, Barrán’s work with coauthor Benjamin Nahum started with the seven-volume Marxist-oriented Historia rural del Uruguay moderno (Montevideo, 1967–78), followed by the eight-volume dependista-influenced Batlle, los estancieros y el Imperio Británico (Montevideo, 1979–87). At this point, Barrán’s scholarship took a more cultural turn, focusing on themes such as religion, medicine, sexuality, crime, and intimacy. Intimidad, divorcio y nueva moral y el...

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