The history of photography and the analysis of photographic practices and experiences in modern Mexico are claiming a central place in the discussion of modernity and culture in Mexican society. Not so long ago, cultural and art historians summed up the contributions of photography to Mexican culture with the honorary mention of one or two photographers, after dedicating the most attention to the fabulous lives and deeds of the three great Mexican mural painters Diego Rivera, José Clemente Orozco, and David Alfaro Siqueiros. Roberto Tejada has written a book that effectively challenges the secondary position art historians have assigned to photography in the landscape of Mexican cultural history. Written as a collection of essays dedicated to pivotal figures in the development of Mexican photography — the Casasola family, Tina Modotti, Edward Weston, Manuel Alvarez Bravo, the Boystown collection — National Camera successfully expands the horizons of the debate on Mexican...

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