This book presents research conducted on the history of social policies in Argentina by two different research teams. In the introduction, the editors state their intent to contribute to the incipient interest in a topic that has been mostly ignored, misunderstood, or ill defined. Therefore, we should not try to seek a strong sense of coherence among the different chapters, or hope to find a common ground or thread through which a clearer picture of social policies developed over several decades would emerge. While for some readers this lack of cohesion could pose a problem, this may be outweighed by the fact that, until recently, the topic has been only marginally researched.

Social policies are defined here as interventions in “secondary forms of income distribution or redistribution” in three areas: the system of work-related social security (including pensions; employment accident insurance; and illness, unemployment, and maternity benefits); policies regarding public...

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