Of the studies that grew out of the 1990s redefinition of Latin American nations as multicultural, most focus on the struggles of indigenous groups and the extension of their rights. Odile Hoffmann’s insightful book centers on black people, bringing together the literature on multiculturalism with that on blackness and race relations. Colombia’s 1991 constitution and the legislation that followed stands out in the Latin American context for conceiving black rural people of the Pacific coast as an ethnic group who should receive communal titles to the land. This legal recognition produced an unprecedented wave of political mobilization around the consolidation of this new identity and the formation of communal territories. Many researchers followed this process. Although in the last 15 years they have produced numerous articles, only recently have they begun to publish monographs based on their experiences. Hoffmann’s is one of several much-awaited books that have appeared in the...

You do not currently have access to this content.