This book makes an outstanding contribution to the music history of colonial Latin America from a perspective — urban and social — that in the Hispanic world has not received the attention it deserves. Previous versions of some chapters have been published as articles, but this volume presents for the first time an integrated vision of musical activity in Cuzco, the old capital of the Inca Empire, which had a predominantly indigenous population during the colonial period. The book, dealing mostly with the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, begins with a chapter devoted to the urban sound-scape (with particular attention to the role of bells, processions, and domestic music), followed by a chapter about the Cathedral and the Seminario de San Antonio Abad (institutions whose music began to be studied by Robert Stevenson and Samuel Claro Valdés). The remaining three chapters discuss convents and monasteries, urban parishes, and rural Indian parishes....

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