Helen Delpar’s goal in this succinct, well-organized, and timely book is both a survey and analysis of the work and views of U.S. historians and social scientists about Latin America from the nineteenth-century precursors to about 1975. She modestly describes her offering as an introduction to a continually evolving scholarship and a follow-up of earlier studies by Howard Cline, Lewis Hanke, and Carl Berger. Happily, she offers much more than a survey of the major trends and setbacks affecting the training, development, and influence of Latin Americanists in the twentieth century. The result is a superb assessment of the state of the field, measured not only by its growth and status in the twentieth-century university but also by the role and views of Latin Americanists at critical times — in the heyday of U.S. empire in the first third of the century, in both world wars (especially in the decade...

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