In this book, Iván Jaksić has followed in the footsteps of other scholars, notably Stanley T. Williams and Richard L. Kagan, who have explored the impact of Spanish history and culture on the writings and worldview of prominent American intellectuals of the nineteenth century. With one exception, he focuses on individuals who have already received substantial attention in this context: Washington Irving, George Ticknor, Henry Wads worth Longfellow, and William Hickling Prescott. The exception is Mary Mann, known to Latin Americanists as the first translator of Domingo F. Sarmiento’s Facundo (1868) into English.

All but Irving were New Englanders, and all flourished during the middle decades of the century. Irving, Prescott, and Ticknor produced the greatest volume of writings on the Hispanic world. Irving, already famous for his tales of New York, wrote romanticized works such as The Alhambra (1832) as well as a best-selling biography of Christopher Columbus (1828)....

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