Dale Torston Graden traces the rise of abolitionist ideology from the halls of British Parliament at the start of the nineteenth century to the continuing struggle of former Brazilian slaves in the post-emancipation period at the century’s end. While this might sound familiar to some readers, the book does not recycle observations made by the classic works on British and Brazilian abolitionism, such as those by Leslie Bethell, Robert Conrad, or Robert Brent Toplin. Rather, it gives historians and students a different look at how slavery ended in Brazil. It is written with a lucid style and offers captivating insights into the involvement of slaves, people of color, and women in the abolition movement; the role of African Candomblé in confronting slavery; and the life and work of the famous Bahian poet Castro Alves.

Similar to the northern British colonies of North America, slavery was gradually abolished in Brazil. Key...

You do not currently have access to this content.