This issue of the Hispanic American Historical Review presents four articles on female economic participation in Argentina, Mexico, and Brazil. As landowners, shopkeepers, merchants, borrowers, lenders, servants, and “household managers,” women took an active part in the development of local, regional, and national economies. In so doing, they also created contradictory images and symbols of female initiative and submission, morality and transgression, defiance and subordination.

Building on recent research on colonial women as economic actors, Pablo Lacoste examines female entrepreneurs in the wine industry of Mendoza, Argentina: specifically, female owners of vineyards, wineries, and pulperías. Owing to Mendoza’s soil and climate, the province was a center of wine production from the 1600s on. Its strategic position on the overland trade route from Buenos Aires to Santiago also made it a major transport center — an “inland port,” in Lacoste’s words. The constant...

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