This book seeks to form a general portrait of the history of political opposition during the so-called century of the Mexican Revolution. According to the author, most of the literature on political opposition has examined it from the point of view of the post-revolutionary regime and its official party; thus, her aim is to present a counterpoint by outlining a narrative from the perspective of “the other side” (p. 9).

Expanding the interpretative framework she developed in her study of the dissident movement of General Henríquez (Ruptura y oposición: El movimiento henriquista, 1945 – 1954, Cal y Arena, 2001) Elisa Servín defines opposition as an “organized political expression, almost always but not only around electoral goals, that is increasingly institutionalized in the form of a political party and that competes, questions, and confronts constituted power through political non-armed action, and whose oppositional path is variable” (p. 11). Her...

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