During the 1920s and the first half of the 1930s a new conception of art flourished in Buenos Aires, embodied in Los Artistas del Pueblo (The People’s Artists). Devoted to painting and printmaking and concerned about the social problems of the Porteña urban reality during the interwar period, this group of artists conceived a socially committed art.

Developing at the end of World War I and the beginning of the Russian Revolution, this movement represented a reaction against the officially sanctioned art and the aesthetic establishment ruling the National Salons and the art gallery circuit. While they fought against the consecrated canon, Los Artistas del Pueblo also rejected the different variants of vanguardism that developed at the same time in visual arts. They preferred realism instead, considering it to be the most accessible style and therefore appropriate for spreading a social message among the ordinary people. To that end, they...

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