The 1960s and 1970s represented something of a golden age in the historical study of Latin American cities. Scholars like Richard M. Morse, James Scobie, Jorge Hardoy, and others pioneered investigations of the major Latin American capitals and, as in the case of Scobie, some of the region’s “secondary cities” as well. Latin American Urban Research, published in the 1970s, kept readers up to date on the latest work on the subject. While interest in the history of cities seemed to lag a bit thereafter, there continues to be an abundant literature on urban politics and urban social issues such as race relations, class conflict, gender dynamics, and crime and violence.

Spanish historian Manuel Lucena Giraldo argues that until recently within the general field of Latin American urban studies there has been a relative neglect of the history of the Spanish American colonial city. In this work, he proposes...

You do not currently have access to this content.