This anthology is a generally successful effort to reframe the issues surrounding social realist art of the 1930s in a hemispheric context. This perspective makes sense, if only because of Mexican muralism’s reverberating impact across the hemisphere. The collection’s approach proves quite refreshing, lending more legitimacy to the study of a still-neglected phase of art history. In keeping with HAHR’s focus, this review will concentrate on the 4 essays (out of 14) that deal with Latino or Latin American topics.

Juan Martínez’s contribution (“Social and Political Commentary in Cuban Modernist Painting of the 1930s”) brings a great deal of new information concerning a subject that is virtually unknown: Cuban murals. The Cuban mural movement was halting and fragmentary, amounting to barely a half-dozen projects, and thus “failed to claim permanent public space.” Yet the murals “represented workers and peasants, popular culture, and leftist politics that had been excluded from...

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